Posts Tagged ‘Chinese computer’

Upcoming Talk at Ohio State University on May 27, 2011

May 17, 2011

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Technologies of Anticipation: How Chinese Typists Invented “Predictive Text” during the Height of Maoism

April 30, 2011

Thomas S. Mullaney of Stanford University will present “Technologies of Anticipation: How Chinese Typists Invented ‘Predictive Text’ during the Height of Maoism,” in Stanford’s Seminar on Science, Technology, and Society (STS).

Abstract: When mechanical Chinese typewriters first entered the marketplace in the 1910s, they featured tray beds containing approximately 2450 free-floating metal characters arranged within a rectangular matrix. Characters were arranged according to the Qing dynasty reference, the Kangxi Dictionary, whose “radical-stroke” system had for centuries formed the basis of an immense and highly diverse information infrastructure encompassing dictionaries, indexes, catalogs, name lists, telegraph codes, typewriters, and more. Beginning in the Republican period (1911-1949), linguists and engineers experimented with alternate organization and retrieval systems, witnessing a proliferation of competing taxonomic systems. It was not until the early Communist period (1949-present), however, that a decentralized network of largely anonymous typists broke with tradition and began to develop natural-language systems of categorizing Chinese characters. Rather than following the radical-stroke system, they sought to maximize the proximity – if not adjacency – of those characters that, when paired together, formed the most commonly used two-character compounds (known in Chinese as ci) and political phrases. What these typists conceptualized and created, this paper will argue, was a technology of probabilistically anticipating the instantly immediate future – or, in other words, the conceptual and practical foundations of what is now referred to as “predictive text” or “autocompletion.” This paper will examine the epistemological, technological, and sociopolitical foundations of this technology, one that has become central to modern computing, commerce, and governmentality.

When: Monday, May 16, 2011. 12:00 PM (Approximate duration of 1.5 hours)

Where: Stanford University, Encina Hall, 2nd Floor East Conference Room (E207) (Map)

Audience: General Public, Students, Faculty/Staff, Alumni/Friends

Sponsor: Hosted by the Program in Science, Technology, and Society (STS)

Admission: Free and Open to the Public

Permalinkhttp://events.stanford.edu/events/264/26429

Pinyin and the Chinese Typewriter

August 26, 2010

While in Paris, I also made contact with the Musée des Arts et Métiers, where I was able to view the various Chinese and Japanese machines in their collection. In my ongoing effort to track Read the rest of this entry »

Cable and Wireless Chinese Typewriter

August 26, 2010

As part of my exploratory work this summer, I visited the Cable and Wireless Archives in Porthcurno (part of the famous Porthcurno Telegraph Museum).

My job here, in addition to reading through extensive collections on the Read the rest of this entry »

April 13, 2010

I’ve just returned from an absolutely wonderful trip to see one of the very few extant IBM Chinese Typewriters from the 1940s. Above all, I wish to express my most sincere thanks to Mr. Thomas Russo at the Museum of Business History and Technology for taking so much time out of his schedule, and for all his help thus far. This was a momentous day.

From the Chinese typewriter to the Chinese computer…

June 13, 2009

Blurring the Line: From the Chinese Typewriter to the Chinese Computer

I just returned from my third oral history session with the Chinese inventor mentioned in my posts in March and May. This time, Iwas finally equipped with a digital camera, and comfortable enough in our working relationship to use it. I took a whole memory chip’s worth of photographs of the machine, which is exquisite.